The Stock Doc maintains a community-based blood donor program for both dogs and cats. The pets that donate to this program, and their owners, are amazing and their efforts have saved countless lives. The purpose of the blood donor program is to provide blood and blood products for use in our canine and feline patients.

How can your dog become a blood donor? They must be between 1 and 10 years old; they must be in good health based on a physical exam by our veterinarians; they must weigh at least 60 pounds to donate a full unit; they cannot have had previous blood transfusions; they cannot be receiving any medication other than heartworm preventative; and the female donors must be spayed and never been pregnant.

PLEASE NOTE: Because of a significant percentage of Doberman Pinchers have some form of von Willebrand’s Disease, they are not acceptable donors.

How can your cat become a blood donor? They must be healthy mixed breed indoor only cats that are over 10 pounds; they must be between 1 and 10 years old; all cats in the household must be negative for Mycoplasma hemofelis, feline leukemia virus and feline immunodeficiency virus; they cannot have had previous blood transfusions; they cannot be receiving any medication other than heartworm preventative; and the female donors must be spayed and never been pregnant.

The Stock Doc will incur the cost of blood typing, the cost of the first complete bloodwork panel, the cost of the first exam, and will give the client a $100 credit on their account when their pet donates blood. Plus, your pet will receive a Blood Donor Hero bandanna when they donate!

To remain on the donor list, our clients must: purchase a complete deworming and heartworm preventative medication from the clinic or our online pharmacy to be given monthly; bring their pet(s) in for annual preventative exams; have annual bloodwork run; and keep their pet(s) up to date on all their vaccinations.

We utilize our blood donors when we have a pet in need due to cardiac insufficiency, chronic anemia, hemorrhagic shock, or liver disease, to name a few instances.

This program does involve inconvenient call times and a mild sedative for the donor but is very rewarding for pet owners who share in the victory of saving a life.